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20121215
20121215
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in america. folks in littleton, colorado, once thought the same about their town. until the shooting at columbine. 13 years later, barry petersen reports the wounds there have still not healed. >> reporter: it was april 20, 1999. two heavily armed columbine students walked into their school and opened fire. they killed 12 students and one teacher before killing themselves. have you ever actually recovered from this? >> no. i mean -- >> reporter: still haunts you? >> yeah, it does. >> reporter: frank de angelis was the principal that day as he is today at columbine. what went through your mind when you heard about what happened in connecticut? you've been there. >> i was in a state of shock. immediately my heart was just broken and kind of nauseous, to be honest with you. >> reporter: his first thoughts were of the agonizing moments as the news spread. >> the thing that weighs on my mind is when parents are waiting in a room and students are not coming to them as the other parents receive their kids. and i'm sure every parent who is in connecticut today when they heard the news were w
faster visited this community today ((butt to)) ((obama)) ther' not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do" >> i don't understand how someone could hurt children. i just don't get that. what did those poor babies do to you? >> evil visited this community today. >> i know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. >> an unthinkable horror. tonight, news details about thee guns bought by his mother, and amid all the grief, the heroes, including the teacher who saved her students by barricading them in a bathroom. >>> good evening. i'm elizabeth cook. >> the sed deadliest school shooting unfolded in just a few minutes. a 20-year-old walked in to an elementary school and started shooting. 20 children are among the dead. it's a crime investigators are only starting to piece together. cbs reporter ines is standing by with the latest. >> i'm standing down the street from where sandy hook elementary school is located. it's a tragedy that has shocked this town. tonight parents and family members are grieving, child
know there's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. >> reporter: it was an emotional president obama who faced the nation today. it was also a rare moment, perhaps a turning point in presidential policy for federal gun control. >> we're going to have to come together and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this, regardless of the politics. >> it is an obvious and perfectly appropriate emotional response to say something's got to be done. >> reporter: uc berkeley criminal law professor believes the american people will also have a change in public sentiment. a call for gun control. but he does not believe it will last long enough to change actual law. >> the only time when most citizens worry about things like assault weapons is in the middle of a mass shooting episode. >> reporter: he says when a mass shooting occurs, gun control is called for. but after the hype dies down, the opponents gain traction because they care vehemently and fight long-term. >> the intensity of the opponents' control will outweigh the mild s
and people being killed at random. i think what is hitting america tonight certainly here in the bay area is the fact that these victims are so young. they are among the most innocent among us. and for this to happen at a school, you know, the safest place in the world... it's just heartbreaking for a lot of people and certainly they are feeling that in the bay area tonight. back to you. >> yeah, should be the safest place for sure. all right, kenny, thanks >>> well, of course, parents will be giving their kids some extra attention and love tonight but also, trying to help them understand and digest the horrific reality of what happened in today's shooting. how do you talk to your kids about this? dr. kim mulvihill has some advice from an expert. >> reporter: scott snyder of martinez is sure his kids have already heard the news. >> i think i'm going to give them a hug -- an extra hug tonight and -- and ask them if they have questions. >> this is a really, really tragic and difficult event. >> reporter: this child psychologist at lucille packard children's hospital. >> often times after
's not a parent in america who doesn't feel the same overwhelming grief that i do. the majority of those who died today were children, beautiful little kids between the ages of five and ten years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them: birthdays, graduations, wedding, kids of their own. among the fallen were also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. so our hearts are broken today. >> reporter: the president also said the nation has endured too many of these mass shootings and for the first time in his presidency he said washington must take meaningful action to prevent similar atrocities. as the president spoke his press secretary jay carney and white house chief of staff sat feet away clutching each other's hands, tears welling in their eyes. >> pelley: major, thank you. we'll be hearing from more of the parents here in newtown, connecticut, wh-s "cbs evening news" continues. to the best vacation spot on earth. (all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisia or florida, they're
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5